Days of Change

Revenge of the Bitter Knitters | July 1, 2014

The Hobby Lobby case is actually indicative of the way Obama got into office and the way he and other Democrats pushed through an agenda. It boils down to one simple principle, no compromise.

Long before the fights with Republicans and the Tea Party and the media and the courts and many others, the Obama campaign had to draw a line with Hillary supporters. I’m not entirely sure why Obama became the primary opposition to Hillary Clinton. Some of it may have been her unelectability due to the fact she galvanized the Republican base. It might have been that Obama was the “other” minority. It also could have been due to the fact that everyone else running for the Democratic nomination had no chance against Hillary and started throwing their support to Obama.

I could speculate for days on how it happened, but one of the first thing to happen when the tide (and Democratic super delegates) turned Obama was the demonization of Hillary supporters. Edwards supporters went into hiding, Biden supporters were nonexistent and the rest were irrelevant. Aside from the moderates and the blue dogs, there were hard-core, left-wing liberal Democrats who loved Hillary (and likely Bill) Clinton. The outspoken supporters found themselves criticized, insulted and eventually banned from popular progressive blogs who quickly rallied around Barack Obama.

They were then ostracized from the key demo of blogs by being called “bitter knitters” or bitter clingers. The Hillary supporter who could not switch sides was stereotyped as old, out-of-touch, low-information women who were more than a little bit racist. They were told even by Democratic operatives that they were not wanted because of their negativity. The message was clear. Dissent was unpatriotic. Even the media suffered the same fate. Liberal critics were shut out of access. Fawning web sites, like the ones who purged their Hillary supporting members, were given special places at the table.What was left was Fox News and PUMAs. John McCain was essentially in the Obama camp of not criticizing Obama.

Most of the Democrats’ early victories were due to large majorities in both houses. Few compromises were necessary, especially when they briefly had a filibuster-proof majority. When the Republicans gained the House and more number sin the Senate, compromises were not the game plan. The Senate made sure to block any House bills. If the House didn’t pass the budget the White House wanted, they cried “shutdown” and used the bully pulpit to make the GOP cave. It was only the consequences of their own actions, and a SCOTUS decision on Medicaid expansion, that started to take down the Democrats.

Now, the Supreme Court is doing what it is supposed to do, making decisions based on appellate cases. It is not here to strike down a massive piece of legislation. If the Republicans wanted to kill Obamacare, they could have killed the budget. However, the true believers are dwindling and the bitter knitters are not wanted, leaving Obama with an approval in the 30s. If he doesn’t want to compromise now, he’ll just lose later.

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1 Comment

  1. If he doesn’t want to compromise now, he’ll just lose later.

    What has he got to lose? He made his position very clear yesterday when he announced boasted that he intends to bypass screw Congress by doing what he wants re: immigration. Heil obama, der fuhrer.

    Comment by Mary — July 2, 2014 @ 1:48 am


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